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About a year ago I started reading [livejournal.com profile] jaylake's blog via recommendation of [livejournal.com profile] kylecassidy. I enjoyed reading the blog and find Jay a detailed and insightful blogger. It was only natural that I try to read one of his books. The first book I picked up was Trial of Flowers. To date, I'm only about a quarter of the way through. That's not to say that I don't like it but the character and circumstances are difficult for me to read except in short pieces. At some point Jay posted about a review, perhaps of this book or another, and a discussion ensued in the comments about books and what people bring to them. I happened to mention that I had started Trial of Flowers and was having a difficult time when someone else recommended Mainspring as a better first read of Jay's works and most likely more in line with my interests. I took a look at a synopsis somewhere (most likely Amazon) and picked it up via my preferred SF con bookseller Larry Smith.

All I can say is wow! It wasn't until I was nearly done with the book that I actually read the jacket comments (or perhaps actually realized what they said) and for a first novel, I'm bowled over. The story is a nearly epic, coming of age/Messiah type story following the main character, Hethor, from leaving his apprenticeship to a watchmaker on his quest via the brass angel Gabriel to find the Key Perilous to wind the Mainspring that keeps the clockwork that powers the gear that encircles Earth's Equator to keep it rotating and orbiting about the Sun. Failure would result in the end of all life on this clockwork Earth. The tale is riveting as we follow Hethor on his travels and encounters. It is well told and, at times, the language reminded me of Ray Bradbury's writings. (Really, there are parts that I must read aloud to friends!) It wasn't until I was well into the book and near the point at which Hethor must descend into the Earth to reach the Mainspring that I had an inkling at the solution to his problem, which is a credit to Jay Lake's masterful storytelling. I highly recommend this book.
adelheid_p: (Default)
I wandered over to [livejournal.com profile] jaylake's blog by way of [livejournal.com profile] kylecassidy. Jay has been, honestly with no holds barred, documenting his battle with cancer on the blog in words and pictures with the help of [livejournal.com profile] shelly_rae and [livejournal.com profile] calendula_witch who are two wonderful women in his life and is now blogging about his chemotherapy which just started this week. I cannot say enough good things about the way he's handling this. He's just an amazing person to me. And it's been very helpful and instructional to read his blog. I thought others would be interested and so I'm sharing. If you haven't been there already, go and take a look.

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December 2012

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